Interseeding Annual Ryegrass into Corn

The increasingly popular practice of interseeding annual ryegrass and other cover crops into spring corn continues to receive attention. Why?

  • In the Northern Corn Belt, growers find efficiency to seed cover crops in the spring, rather than the fall, when the window of opportunity for planting is very slim – between harvest and onset of winter.
  • The annual ryegrass gets established in young corn, but goes nearly dormant when the corn foliage creates too much shadow for more cover crop growth beneath it.
  • Interseeding annual ryegrass does not compete with the corn for nutrients or moisture, given that it goes nearly dormant.
  • Once the harvest is complete in the fall, the annual ryegrass picks up where it left off in the spring. The fact that the cover crop is already well established increases the chances it will survive the winter weather.

2015 Interseeding MN

It’s important to interseed the cover crop into corn that is about knee high. Dan Towery, an expert in interseeding, says that you want to let the corn get at least to V4 stage before planting the ryegrass. Otherwise it might compete with the corn for sunlight.

For more information, you can contact Towery at this email address: dan@agconservationsolutions.com

To read the whole article, click here. The article begins on page 17.

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Annual Ryegrass and other Cover Crops – New Tips on Termination

Admittedly, this is late for the 2017 burndown season. And yet, it’s important to share while it’s topical…managing cover crops is a “growing” interest and we’ll keep an eye on posting an update early next year.

Mike Plumer is the key driver for this article, published a couple months ago by No-Till Farmer magazine. It was taken largely from a seminar Mike did at the National No-Till Conference in St. Louis, earlier in the year. Check out the whole article. It has great tips about managing burndown when the cover crop includes annual ryegrass in a “cocktail mix”. It also looks at the issue of annual ryegrass varieties, and how important it is to know the source of the seed. Different varieties emerge from winter dormancy, for example, which provides problems when trying to kill it in a timely fashion.

ARG burndown

Finally, Mike’s discussion covers the subject of killing annual ryegrass once it has reached the “joint” stage or beyond, when control with generic glyphosate will not be enough. Click here to see the entire article.

 

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Increase Your ROI 266% with Cover Crops

Some say that in a down economy, planting annual ryegrass or another cover crop is too expensive. The managing editor of No Till Farming magazine just published an article that shows otherwise.

Based on data from Ken Rulon, who farms more than 3000 acres in Arcadia, Indiana, you can’t afford not to plant cover crops. Not only  does it protect and build healthy soil, prevent erosion, reduce compaction, increase infiltration of rain and snow melt, boost organic matter and microbial activity….it also boosts profits!

Read the article here, by managing editor Laura Barrera, posted earlier this month.

varner arg michigan 4-08 (2)

 

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Annual Ryegrass – Now What?

Ok, so now the annual ryegrass is killed. It’s residue will soon become worm food. The decaying roots will become added food for a rich soil biology. The channels left by the decayed roots will create more friability in the soil…crumbly, pliable, spacious. Moreover, new corn and soybean roots will be able to find their way deeper into the soil profile, where added moisture and nutrients can build a more productive crop this year.

Some who are now contemplating corn planing activity may wish to consider adding a next round of annual ryegrass within a short time thereafter. For years now, producers have been having success with “interseeding” annual ryegrass into their corn, when it is less than knee high (V4- V5 stage).

We will cover this subject more in the coming weeks, but for now you could take a look at the following publications, each covering aspects of the reasons, the methods and the benefits of planting a cover crop in the spring.

2015 Interseeding MN

Penn State Extension Service article

Univ. of Minnesota Extension

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Glyphosate and Monsanto Clear The Hurdle

An alternative health blogger known as Food Babe has been going toe to toe with Monsanto for years, trying to get traction with consumers on the dangers of glyphosate…Monsanto’s RoundUp.

She has postulated that glyphosate, even in minute traces per billion, causes cancer. But in a recent rebuttal from Snopes.com (an independent, myth-busting organization made up mainly of scientific journalists), they report that the scare tactics leveled by Food Babe are “FALSE”.

RoundUp logo

The federal EPA agency began looking at glyphosate in 1985, and by 1993 concluded it is carcinogenic. They talked about the herbicide’s ability to become waterborne and thus get into drinking water, as well as foods that live in soil exposed to glyphosate.

Since then, it was shown that studies linking cancer to glyphosate relied on concentrations of the chemical that were way out of proportion with amounts that are used in agricultural applications. Recent tests that show potentially adverse effects at lower exposures are also suspect, as peer review has raised questions about scientific methods and data validity.

In March of 2015, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer said that glyphosate “may have some carcinogenic potential” but, the consensus among the world’s regulatory agencies, according to the Snopes.com article, is that glyphosate “is safe for consumption and non-carcinogenic at environmentally relevant levels.”

Consequently, the World Health Organization concluded: “Glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans from exposure through the diet.”

Click here to review the Snopes.com article.

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The Chemistry of Burndown of Annual Ryegrass

Glyphosate is the most common herbicide used to control annual ryegrass. It’s very important to use a rate that is adequate. The minimum rate of glyphosate recommended for annual ryegrass is 1.25-1.50 lb a.e./acre with ammonium sulfate and surfactant in late March to early April. Use 1.75 lb a.e./acre if needed.

Glyphosate products vary in concentration and this affects application rate. Here are two application examples to provide the necessary 1.25-1.50 lb/acre a.e.:

  • A 41% glyphosate product containing 3 lbs/gal of a.e. (acid equivalent). Application rate should be 53-64 oz/acre
  • Roundup PowerMax is a 48.7% glyphosate product with 4.5 lb/gal of a.e. Application rate should be 36-43 oz/acre

While one burndown application should provide control of the annual ryegrass, growers should plan for two applications, especially if the initial spray conditions were cool

  • Consider using an herbicide with a different mode of action if re-spraying is needed (Research is currently testing alternatives to glyphosate and tank mixes with glyphosate to reduce the dependence on this important herbicide)

Even when annual ryegrass is small it requires full rates of herbicides to achieve control. Low rates will often stress the plant making it more difficult to control at a later date

  • In years with marginal weather conditions, or where the ryegrass is in the jointing stage, use a higher rate of glyphosate (1.75 lb a.e./acre) to help insure complete control. Using a full label rate once is preferred to split applications of a lower rate.

 

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Killing Annual Ryegrass Cover Crops Adds to Soil Organic Matter

Cereal rye is a great cover crop. Sometimes, however, the amount of biomass in the spring creates difficulty for drilling corn seed. The excess vegetation can impede proper planting and can also take moisture out of the soil that crops will need this summer.

Annual ryegrass doesn’t create as much biomass,The residual left by the annual ryegrass after burndown quickly decomposes into the no-till soil. It becomes food for soil critters and microorganisms. And the massive root network slowly decomposes too, building organic matter. The channels created by ryegrass roots become channels for corn roots. The combination of root channels and more organic matter allows better infiltration of rain. but it is important to spray the crop out in a timely fashion.

Corn roots in ARG 6-06 Starkey
Annual ryegrass, if let grow too long, can be more difficult to kill. And letting it go to seed is asking for trouble…nobody wants to contend with a cover crop that gets away.

Last week’s blog discusses the proper guidelines for applying herbicide to kill the cover crop. Here’s a linkto the management guide where those instructions are.

 

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Terminating Annual Ryegrass Effectively – the 1st Time

The first important step in controlling annual ryegrass used as a cover crop is the timing of the burndown.

  • It is best done when the plant is small, 6-9” in height, and preferably before the first node has developed. Typically, this happens in late March to late-April depending on weather and farm location.
  • Make sure the crop is actively growing, so as to optimize the uptake of the herbicide (glyphosate).
  • Daytime minimum temperature should be at 55 degrees (F) and above 60 is better. •  If night temperatures drop below 38, wait three days before spraying. • Soil temperatures should be above 45.

Early termination of the cover crop makes control easier and reduces the amount of residue into which you’ll plant corn or soybeans.

  • Early control also facilitates soil dry-down, allows for significant decomposition of annual ryegrass residue and release of nutrients for uptake by the corn or soybean crop.

Some growers have found it easier to plant into the annual ryegrass first and then apply a burndown. Warmer weather conditions improve glyphosate activity and planting into green vegetation has been successful, and is often easier than planting into a “half-dead” cover crop.

Warm temperatures and actively growing annual ryegrass plants are a must for effective control.

  • Use a thorough spray coverage using moderate spray pressure and a medium spray droplet size. Don’t use air induction spray systems or nozzles that produce coarse droplets.
  • The application rate should be about 8-12 gallons per acre.
  • Spray at least 4 hours prior to sunset to allow for maximum translocation of the glyphosate within the plant.
  • While one burn-down herbicide application often provides control of the annual ryegrass. Inspect the results and then be ready for a second application if needed. (If you use too weak an herbicide solution, it will make the plant more resistant and more difficult to control later.)
  •  Apply glyphosate at 1.25-1.50 lb a.e./a with ammonium sulfate and surfactant. Follow label directions carefully with respect to pH and mixing order. It is important when adding ammonium sulfate, buffering agents or water conditioners that they be added to the full spray tank of water and agitated for 3-5 minutes before adding the glyphosate. Additional NIS surfactant, if called for, is normally added last.
  • Weather conditions affect how well glyphosate controls annual ryegrass and a second application may be required.

 

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Time to Terminate Annual Ryegrass Cover Crops

The fields may already be clear of snow. You may already be noticing that the annual ryegrass or other cover crops are starting to show life. Watch carefully and be vigilant about terminating the crop before the grass reaches the “joint” stage.

Here are a couple of timely resources to help you figure out the timing, the right chemicals, the right dosage and whether or not you need to spray again. It’s best to get it right with the first application but there is a plan B should the first spray application not do the trick.

ARG burndown

Click here for a free management brochure about annual ryegrass.

Click here for a quick guide to successful burndown of annual ryegrass.

Click here to learn about the residual effect of herbicides on corn and beans.

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Making a Nitrogen Bank Account with Ryegrass as a Cover Crop

Here’s how Eileen Kladivco put it: Even with well-managed corn and soybean production, there is always some leaching of nitrate that originates either from residual fertilizer N or from the natural decomposition of soil organic matter. Our annual cropping systems are “leaky” because there are long fallow periods between crop maturity in September and the active growth of the next cash crop in May. Most of the net downward flow of water to the drains occurs precisely during this long fallow period, when there is nothing to take up the nitrate. 

IMG_0145 (2)

Eileen is an agronomy department professor at Purdue University, a well-regarded researcher and teacher about soil and making agriculture more profitable. She goes on to say that, Non-legume cover crops will scavenge or “trap” soil nitrate that would otherwise move out of the rootzone into tile drains or groundwater. Cover crops actively take up nitrate during a portion of that fallow season, reducing the losses that occur to tile drains and recycling the nitrogen for later use. To read her Full article – click here.

In another publication, the author talked about the biomass of cover crops. Basically, he said that more biomass generally means more nutrients and organic matter returned to the soil.

The “plant available nitrogen” (PAN) released from a cover crop depends on what cover crop you’re growing and when you terminate the cover crop. As the cover crop plant matures, more nitrogen gets stored in the stems, so in general it’s best to terminate the cover crop before it reaches that stage. With annual ryegrass, terminating it before it reaches 6 or so inches in the spring is important…both to take advantage of the nitrogen available but also to keep the plant from reaching the joint stage.

As soil organisms decompose cover crop residues, part of cover crop is released as carbon dioxide. The rest decomposes and contributes to the soil organic matter…as well as giving up the stored nitrogen for the corn or beans maturing in the same soil.

The high price of nitrogen has growers looking for way to be more efficient. Using annual ryegrass may provide 60-80 lbs of nitrogen per acre. This alone could more than pay for the cost of the seed and planting the cover crop. For more information on annual ryegrass and its capacity as a nitrogen sink, click here.

 

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